Turf Fertilization

Let’s Talk Turf

Fertilizing  turfgrass isn’t just about enhancing green color for aesthetic. Fertilizing turf maintains the lawn density and plant vigor, and encourages growth and recovery from turf damage and seasonal stresses (such as a drought season). If you own a commercial property, manage an HOA, or a facility manager at a municipality, you’re probably well-informed about this subject already. But do you know that your window of time to fertilize is short? Are you working with certified and licensed landscapers skilled in the fertilization testing and application process? We aren’t talking about regular ‘ol landscape maintenance. We are talking TURF. And having unhealthy turfgrass is out of the question for your facility or property.

What happens when you don’t fertilize turf?

Unfertilized turf will gradually lose density. Undesirable grasses (such as crabgrass) and broadleaf weeds (such as dandelion and clover) will encroach and the risk for soil erosion then increases. Properly fertilized turf better tolerates heat, drought, cold, and regular wear from traffic.  Malnourished turfgrasses are also more prone to damage from diseases and insects — this damage is more noticeable and recovery takes longer.

Applying the correct fertilizer at the right time helps turfgrass accumulate and store the essential plant foods (sugars/carbohydrates) that it requires for healthy growth and development. Dense, properly fertilized lawns require fewer pesticides to manage weeds, insects, and diseases in the long run.

Fertilizing turf should be handled by a professional, to achieve the best results. The process includes soil testing, tissue testing and reviewing the “fertilizer basics.”We review the phosphorus and potassium levels, as well as nitrogen sources. We review the nutrients offered in fertilizers and compare to turf testing results. From there, we calculate the ratios for turfgrass fertilization.

We strongly encourage our commercial, municipal and HOA clients to take the next month to have your turf tested and fertilized. Please contact us to schedule an appointment.

Before and After Turf

The turf on the left has not been fertilized for three years and is malnourished. The leaves are yellowing (chlorotic) and the soil is becoming visible near the canopy base. The turf on the right has been regularly fertilized. It has a pleasing green color and much higher shoot density to resist pests. Photo and caption from Purdue Extension.

Bayscape Blog

Free Summer Gifts You Can Grow In Your Own Backyard

Have you ever thought about a flower garden as a source for thoughtful gifts? With so many potential uses, and the side benefit of having a beautiful yard, we think it’s an idea worth considering.

Gardeners love annual flowers for their beauty, variety, and flexibility. They make great additions to container gardens, fill in flowerbeds, and some can fit quite nicely in window boxes. The broad diversity of annuals allows gardeners to create interesting and exciting combinations of flowers that bloom across the Spring and Summer seasons.

That variety also makes annuals a great choice for creating your own fantastic bouquets that you can bring to dinner parties, give to friends and loved ones, or use to decorate your own home.

California’s largely temperate climate provides a lot of flexibility when it comes to planting annual flowers, so there are many annuals that grow well here in the Bay Area. Some of the more common types include:

Cosmos – These plants produce bowl or open cup shaped, daisy-like flowers atop long stems. They come in colors including orange, red, pink, maroon, yellow, and white.

Sunflowers – Big, tall, and bright, sunflowers are the iconic summer flower. Most are yellow, though there are red varieties, and most will grow quite tall (up to 16 ft.). Shorter versions have been developed if height is an issue in your space.

Petunias – A very popular flower, petunias have delicate flowers (that can be prone to damage from heavy rain). Grandiflora petunias have larger flowers, while Multiflora petunias have smaller but more numerous flowers.

Marigolds – Typically known for their gold colored, carnation-like flowers, marigolds come in a number of varieties. French marigolds and rock-garden marigolds offer smaller, daintier flowers. The great thing about marigolds is that they will usually put out bright blooms all summer.

Bayscape Blog Petunias

Petunias

Impatiens – With flowers somewhat like petunias, impatiens make good houseplants due to their preference for shade. They also bloom into the fall, which helps extend the life of your flower garden.

There are also a lot of interesting and more unusual varietals you can use to add a bit of flair:

Zinnias – Zinnias make great cutting flowers. They grow quite quickly and bloom heavily, with a single flower on each stem. Their bright colors can attract butterflies.

Mexican sunflowers – The big yellow Sunflower’s smaller cousin, the tithonia plant has
daisy-like flowers in a variety of colors, typically yellow, orange, and red. This flower is a preferred food for Monarch butterflies.

Bayscape Blog Mexican Sunflower Annuals

Mexican Sunflower

Lavatera – With abundant blooms of smaller flowers in vibrant lavender shades, these grow into bushy plants that provide plenty of cut flowers.

To add fragrance:

Stock – Stock flowers, also known as Gillyflower or Matthiola incana, produce attractive and interesting flowers in colors like pink, purple, red, and white that also happen to smell wonderful. Stock plants prefer cooler weather.

Reseda (mignonette) – While it may not be the best looking flower of the bunch, Reseda is very well known for its fragrance, having been cultivated for just that reason since before the 1700’s.

Nicotiana – A member of the tobacco family, Nicotiana are another type of fragrant, flowering annual. Their flowers are typically trumpet shaped florets, with lavender, red, rose, pink, white, and yellow colors. The flowers grow on slim stems, and the plants are usually 1 to 3 feet high.

To round out your bouquets, and garden arrangements, you’ll want some attractive foliage:

Caladium – Commonly called Elephant Ears, Caladium’s large colorful leaves really stand out. They typically prefer shade and can work well indoors, although some newer versions can handle some sun.

Coleus – There are low-growing, midsize, and tall types of coleus, with many color and texture variations among them. Bright magenta to buttery yellow, smooth to frilly, coleus can add a lot to a bouquet (or your garden).

 Bayscape Blog annuals dusty miller

Bouquet with Dusty Miller acccents

Dusty miller – The silvery grey foliage of dusty miller plants provide distinct contrast from other plants and flowers in your garden or bouquet. They hold up well through the summer and can tolerate some frost.

We’re already entering prime season for planting annuals, so don’t wait much longer.

If you need assistance, Bayscape Landscape can provide expert garden planning and installation services. 

Bayscape Landscape Rebate Santa Clara County

How To Renovate Your Yard (And Get Paid To Do It)

Did you know:  You can get paid $1-$2 per square foot to convert your yard to a more sustainable landscape. Yep, it’s true.

Because of the extensive drought affecting California for the past several years, an old program that pays property owners to make their landscape more sustainable has been reinstated. By removing non-native, water-intensive plants and replacing them with approved plants that grow naturally without extra water you can qualify for a cash rebate from the water district.

What’s the catch? Well, first, you have to live in Santa Clara County in California. The program is run by the Santa Clara Valley Water District with the San Jose Municipal Water System, City of Morgan Hill, and the City of Cupertino joining as partners.

Depending on the type and size of your property and the city you’re in, you could receive up to $2,000-$3,000 for a single family dwelling or up to $20,000-$30,000 for a commercial property.

To qualify, commercial or residential property owners must call and request a pre-inspection to receive approval for inclusion in the program. Once approved, property owners must replace high water usage plants (like irrigated turf grass) with at least 50% plant coverage using plants from the water district’s approved plant list.

Check out the Santa Clara Water District website for all the rebate details and numbers to call for pre-inspections.

Even without the Santa Clara Water District rebate, converting your landscaping makes a lot of sense. The benefits of a sustainable landscape are many:

  • Spend less money on water and fertilizer – Lawns are especially thirsty, and often require a fair amount of fertilizer and weed mitigation to thrive in soil they aren’t adapted for. By contrast, native plants are accustomed to the local environment. That allows them to thrive with little to no help from your pocketbook.
  • Reduce time spent doing maintenance – You can probably think of a few things you would rather be doing than mowing the lawn (again). Pretty much all landscaping is going to require some maintenance, but grass in particular is pretty time-intensive compared to succulents or shrubs.
  • Increase energy efficiency – As the previous points suggest, plants that can survive on their own are require significantly less energy. Water, fertilizer, maintenance, all of these things require energy to transport, create, and apply.
  • Restore habitats – Native vegetation is the cornerstone of a vibrant, healthy local ecology. That helps to promote and protect local food supplies by, for example, increasing the number of pollinators needed for crops. A more natural environment also contributes to our own mental well being.
  • Enjoy the unique beauty of local flora – Why should your outdoor space look the same as someone who lives in the Midwest or East Coast? Bay Area cities like San Jose and Santa Clara are home to all sorts of unique plants. For some idea of the incredible variety of California’s native plant life check out Cal Flora.

The value of sustainable landscaping has never been higher, and the timing has never been better to make the switch. Bayscape has helped numerous clients update their residential landscape, improving aesthetics, efficiency, and the value of the property.

If you’d like to discuss options for your property don’t hesitate to give us a call!

How To Mulch Flower Beds

Amazing Benefits of Mulching Flower Beds

You’re not just mulching a flower bed for aesthetics. It may make the flower beds look pretty, but mulching has great benefits!

Stop pulling weeds

Ever wonder why a bare patch of soil loves to grow weeds? That’s just mother nature protecting her soil from blowing or washing away. Mulching is a chore that will save you time and headache from pulling weeds. It keeps weeds down, mainly by blocking out light they need to grow.

Mulching can help control erosion

Mulching conserves soil moisture by reducing evaporation, and helps prevent erosion caused by rain and wind. Bare soil often gets a crust on it that prevents rain from penetrating easily. Also, the bare soil can lose about 5 times as much sediment as soils covered with mulch.

Mulch moderates soil temperatures

Mulch keeps soil cooler in summer and helps to reduce the risk of damage to plant roots in winter.

Mulch keeps top soil loose and airy

Organic material adds all-important humus, the organic component of soil, formed by the decomposition of leaves and other plant material by soil microorganisms. Great for plants!

How to Lay Mulch in a Flower Bed

  • If re-mulching a bed, remove some of the old mulch. Sometimes mulch has been added to the beds 3 or 4 times. Take out some of the mulch that has built up over time.
  • Layer mulch 2″ to 4″ deep over bare soil around your plants. Don’t put it right on top of perennials and keep it from direct contact with the bark of trees and shrubs, as excess moisture right up against the bark can cause rot or disease.
  • When you get close to an edge, such as pavement, stone or tiles, be sure to thin out the mulch so the presentation is even.
  • What season to lay mulch? Preferably early spring, before hot weather comes and while your annuals & perennials are still small enough to work around.

Quick Tip! If you have a few spare 1 or 2 gallon containers, put them over the top of your plants first. Then, shovel the mulch material right onto your bed without worrying about covering them or dirtying leaves! Lastly, don’t forget to mulch around your trees. Learn more about the benefits of tree mulch here.

Frost Protection Tips for San Jose

Pruning During Frost Season? Stop!

It’s officially winter and many of us are off from work, kicking back, relaxing with some egg nog and sleeping off the holiday meals. But for us gardeners, there is one very important task you can’t skip over during your “off” time.

 

We are talking about FROST.

 

A cold hard frost can be devastating to gardens and trees. While some plants can come back and leaf out after the frost season, others may not be as lucky.

Before we get into how to protect plants from frost, let’s learn how to tell if frost is on the way:
 
1. Still air.
2. No cloud cover. 
3. Low humidity. 
4. Low temperatures (45 degrees or less by 10pm).

 

If you notice frost warning signs, do the following to protect plants against frost damage:

 

Before the frost hits, water plants, but don’t water succulents (a succulent stores water in its tissues and can develop ice crystals, which will damage the plant). Water only enough so soil around the plant is moist. Moist soil holds and releases more heat than dry soil, which creates a more humid environment around the plant.

Move potted or container plants near the walls of your home, where they’ll benefit from radiated heat. If you place in the garage, place near the shared wall to your heated home. You can also move to a closed-in porch, anywhere there may be some heat to spare!

If the plant can not be moved, use frost cloth or sheets. Prop up the fabric in a tent-like structure, so the fabric does not come in contact with the plant. In the morning, remove the cover and allow the plant to breathe and, if it’s sunny, soak up some rays. If frost is predicted for the next night, cover them again and repeat until no more frost (if you have outdoor plants you are afraid of losing, take some cuttings now and root them indoors).

 

Frost has damaged my plants. How do I treat the plants?

 

Leave them be. Plants should unthaw naturally and gradually to avoid rupturing plant cells in the leaf tissue. Pruning away the damage can encourage the plant to produce new growth, which will be more frost tender than the older growth. You may also accidentally prune healthy growth, mistaken for frost damaged growth. We suggest you do not prune frost sensitive plants until danger of frost has past.

Need more advice? We have been maintaining landscape throughout San Jose and Santa Clara County for over 35 years and are standing by to assist you! Feel free to contact Bayscape Landscape Management.

 

Is it a Garden Snail or Slug?

Is it a Garden Snail? Or is it a Garden Slug?

Our January climate brings cool, wet weather which provides perfect conditions for slugs and snails to attack our gardens! Snails and slugs feed on the leaves of many plants. They also eat ripening fruits and vegetables (they aren’t picky, slugs and snails like the leaves and fruits of a wide range of crops such as lettuce, basil, broccoli, and strawberries).

If slugs are abundant one year, it does not mean they will be as common the following season; the relative number of slugs depends on how moist the growing conditions are, and if you employ preventative measures to control slugs and snails. Before we get to how to treat for snails and slugs, first we need to learn how to identify a snail, how to identify a slug, and how to tell if you have snails and slugs in your garden!

 

Chances are, if you have snails in your garden, it is the common garden snail…

 

…also called the brown garden snail. The common garden snail can be identified by its brown coiled shell and gray body. Shells on their backs and are 1 to 1-1/2 inches long. 

Slugs are best described as snails without shells. They are a type of mollusk, related to clams and oysters. Slugs are soft bodied, generally brownish or grayish, with eye stalks. They vary in size from 1/8 to 2 inches long (longer when stretched out). It’s cousin – the banana slug – may be up to 4 to 6 inches long

Most slugs and snails are dark or light gray, tan, green, or black; some have darker spots or patterns. Slugs and snails leave a slime (mucus) trail that they secrete as they move. Eggs are clear, oval, or round, and are laid in jelly-like masses.

 

How to find snails and slugs in the garden:

 

 To find slugs or snails, look after dark, before dawn, or on cloudy days. Check underneath plants, bottoms of boards and rocks, and on low growing foliage, especially in shady areas.
Look for colorless eggs, about the size of a BB, in clusters under dirt clods or on the underside of large leaves near the crown of plants. Egg laying occurs during warm months, especially in the fall.

 

How to identify slug and snail damage to plants:

 

Slug damage is apparent in irregularly shaped chewed out spots on leaves. Slugs are especially fond of lush or succulent plants like basil, beans, cabbage, citrus trees, dahlias, hostas, lettuce, and strawberries. Watch for the silvery trail they leave behind as they move. If you’re not sure what’s causing damage to your plants, this secretion is a telltale sign of slug or snail activity! Read our next article on how to organically control and treat snails and slugs.

Treating Slugs in the Garden

How To Organically Control Snails and Slugs in the Garden

A typical San Jose January brings cool, wet weather which provides perfect conditions for slugs and snails to attack your gardens – and they are especially damaging in shady gardens. The severity of the damage from snails and slugs could really depend on the type of slug or snail that you are dealing with. Be sure to review our previous article, how to identify a slug versus a snail.

Slugs are especially numerous during rainy seasons and in well-irrigated gardens. If slugs are abundant one year, it does not mean they will be as common the following season; the relative number of slugs depends on how moist the growing conditions are, and if you employ preventative measures to control slugs and snails. In this article, you will learn several effective methods to get rid of snails and slugs. We list many organic ways to get rid of slugs and snails and preventative measures to help control snails and slugs in the garden.

 

Organic treatments to control – or get rid of – slugs and snails:

 

  • Rake your garden to remove leaves, plant debris and slug eggs. Also remove boards, rocks, or anything that provides them shelter (they love hiding out in dark, shady places).
  • Do not place mulch any thicker than three inches, and avoid large wood chips. You get the benefits of mulching for your plants and trees, but also minimize a desired environment for slugs and snails.
  • – Introduce beneficial insects and pests to the garden. There are many types of beneficial pests that feed on slugs such as beetles, toads, turtles, shrews, starlings and other birds. Be sure to minimize the use of chemical pesticides, to maximize the effect of natural pests to the garden. You can reduce chemicals by using baits and avoiding unnecessary pesticides applications. Don’t worry, these natural pests won’t touch the valuable crops and plants.
  • – Gritty substances, such as crushed eggshells, diatomaceous earth, and sand make effective snail repellents, as they cut the snails and injure them. Sprinkle around plants that the garden snails seem to prefer, and grit will deter and eventually kill these pests (diatomaceous earth is the fossilized remains of sea organisms. Read more about it at diatomaceous.org).
  • – Certain plants deter slugs and snails. An effective way to deter the slugs and snails from roaming your garden is to grow these plants around and in-between your valuable crops and plants. Plants to consider include: sage, yucca, hydrangeas, lavender, rosemary, and mint. Plants that deter slugs in shaded areas include astilbe, dicentra, vinca, and viola. Plants resistant to slugs that grow in partial shade include phlox, mentha, and campanula.
  • – a vinegar solution is an effective organic home remedy to get rid of slugs and snails. This works with a snail trap method. Set up a wooden board at night so the slugs and snails gather. The next morning, check under (and on) board for any unwanted pests and spray with vinegar solution (don’t get any of the solution on the plants themselves).
  • – Who knew?! Slugs LOVE grapefruits. Cut a grapefruit in halves and discard the pulp (you can save this and enjoy later). Once all the insides are removed, place the grapefruit peels upside down in your garden and leave them overnight. The next morning, you should have hopefully captured some slugs and snails. 

 

There are chemical treatments for garden snails and slugs. A variety of slug and snail baits and poisons are available from a commercial provider, but many of them are highly toxic to humans and pets. For a safer solution, look for baits made of iron phosphate. Scatter baits evenly in slug prone areas in the early evening after watering.  We suggest  to call a professional, like Bayscape Landscape Management, to assist and advise with placing and using chemical treatments for snails and slugs.

 

Bayscapes Summer Bulb Planting Guide

There’s A Big Pay-off to Planting Summer Bulbs Now

It’s the most wonderful time, of the year! As we hang mistletoe, place our perfectly bright red poinsettias around the hearth, and fill the home with the sweet aroma of holiday dishes, we are also thinking of another important holiday tradition  – planting summer bulbs!

Wait? What? Planting summer bulbs?!

Gardeners across the US baffle at the fact that over here on the California Coast, and even up through parts of Northeast, NOW is the time to plant those bulbs. See, our ground (rarely) doesn’t freeze! You may see morning frost on your car windows, but throw on some gloves and head to the garden this afternoon. Take a few minutes to get those bulbs planted and enjoy a beautiful gift of dynamic and healthy blooms in just a few short months. Your summer garden will thank you!

 

This wouldn’t be a complete article without a  list of summer bulbs to plant in the San Jose area, so here it goes:

 

Agapanthus
Amaryllis
Begonia
Calla Lily
Dahlia
Begonia
Poppies
Peruvian Daffodil
Persian Buttercup
Jacobean Lily

 

And what  bulb arrangement will you follow? Here’s our favorite DIY design ideas for summer bulbs:

 

  • Plant bulbs in clusters. Bulbs give the biggest impact of color when in one concentrated area. Bulb stalks can be thin, so when planted alone, they won’t have as much aesthetic effect. 
  • Try “stacking” bulbs. Choose a small and large bulb that flower during the same period. Plant small bulbs in a layer right on top of large bulbs. This will create a layer effect when the bloom. Like Bayscape’s seasonal color program, you could try staggering the bloom time by planting mid- and late-season bloomers together, creating a display that blooms in succession, for a whole season of amazing color to your landscape!

 

So, throw on your scarf, head out to the gardening or home improvement store, then grab your gardening spade. There are many reasons that summer bulbs make the world a more colorful, happier place to be (we even wrote a blog about the versatility and benefits of bulbs). As you are spreading the holiday cheer this time of year, spread some cheer into your garden and receive the gift of beautiful blooms next spring! Visit our website to learn more about how Bayscape Landscape can help you with your seasonal bulb color arrangements.

Cleaning Gutters Bayscape San Jose

Clean Gutters Before They Clean Out Your Bank Account

Gutters. They are out of sight, and out of mind. Unlike major aesthetic parts of your home – a large outdoor fire pit, for example – gutters are a part of the house that most people don’t spend much time thinking about or looking at.

The problem is that, much like a healthy heart, things that you can’t see or just don’t look at still need to be maintained so that they can keep functioning. According to the Insurance Information Institute, ice, snow and wind can have devastating consequences and millions of dollars in insured losses are due to frozen gutters. San Jose (and the rest of Santa Clara County) is not exempt from damage to landscapes or structures from clogged gutters!

The long and short of it is – gutters need to heave a clear path in order for rain and snow to work their way through the system, and fallen leaves and other debris can cause substantial blockage in that system.

Let’s take a closer look at all the reasons rain gutters can be a threat to your home’s well-being.

 

1. Avoid unnecessary damages and costs

 

The first and most obvious issue with gutters filled with leaves, sticks, twigs, and other debris is simply a weight problem. When the debris gets wet, it absorbs the rain water like a sponge and becomes extremely heavy. This burden puts stress on the gutters and their hanging brackets, and can pull the gutters off the house. Gutters are costly enough to replace, not to mention any windows and landscaping they smash as they come crashing down.

Overflowing water from the gutters can also damage the paint and siding on a home, and create water marks down the side of the house. That pales in comparison with when the water get inside of a wall. Wet wood rots and loses its integrity, and this can go unseen behind the siding. Let’s not forget mold and mildew! Ew!

Consumer Reports says, “Check the entire gutter system seasonally for proper pitch and for clogs, corrosion, broken fasteners, and separation between connections and where gutters meet the fascia board,” the group advises.

 

2. Eliminate pests

 

Clogged gutters = standing water. Standing water = an unlimited invite to unwanted pests – such as mosquitos. Mosquitos love to use standing water as places to lay their eggs. Which can lead to bigger problems we face today: West Nile Virus and Zika Virus. The Centers for Disease control recommends that homeowners make sure to clean out their rain gutters to help prevent spread of disease. Even here in San Jose, we need to be diligent.

 

3. Water Conservation is STILL important, and your gutters play a part

 

Sometimes fall weather is still hot, and when our San Jose community may be looking at parched creek beds and brown or nonexistent grass, it’s easy to think rain gutters are not important right now. But this is actually the perfect time to inspect and clean them, or even better, have it done professionally.

Don’t fall for the “it’s bone dry” line of thinking – get ahead of the weather and save yourself a huge amount of time, money, and effort when those gutters are needed. If you are ever in doubt or need a hand on your property to help maintain the landscape, never hesitate to contact Bayscape Landscape Management! We service San Jose and surrounding cities!

The 411 on Green Roofs for Your Home

It’s not always possible for people to take extended breaks from modern life, but more and more people are looking for ways to bring elements of nature closer to home. One of the ways homeowners are looking to create financially and environmentally viable living spaces is through the installation of “green” roofs.

So, what is a green roof, and how do you know if might be right for you?

1. What is a Green Roof?

 
A green, or living roof, is essentially an installed rooftop garden that generally consists of a waterproof membrane, draining layers and insulation, and soil and plants. Though the appearance, style, and composition can vary widely, there are both extensive and intensive varieties. Extensive green roofs are generally less accessible but also lower-maintenance, featuring shallower soil and plants like succulents and other drought-resistant varieties (or sometimes grasses or pre-vegetated mats) that require little more than rainwater in the way of watering. Intensive green roofs are more accessible and utilize more soil. The distinctions between these two affect everything from cost and labor time to structural requirements.

2. What are the benefits of a Green Roof for my home?

 
The benefits are numerous, and both tangible and more abstract/subjective. Green roofs reduce greenhouse gases, energy and insulation needs, stormwater pollution and runoff, and flooding potential. They can increase (sometimes drastically) the lifespan of your roof, beauty and curb appeal, and the availability of habitats for wildlife from birds to butterflies.

3. What are the requirements for a residential Green Roof installation?

 
There are structural requirements for any green roof, thus it’s advised to first consult with a structural engineer. Flat roofs, or those angled up to about 30 degrees, are usually good candidates. The structure also has to be able to support and hold the weight of a green roof, which can be substantial (about 20 lb./sq. ft.). The roof should also be in a generally sunny area. Many cities and towns have permit and other requirements for green roofs.

4. What are the costs for a Green Roof for my home?

 
 Costs vary widely, from $12-45/sq. ft. installed. The cost is dependent on many factors, like whether you are installing an extensive or intensive roof (extensive are generally less expensive upfront), size of the structure (some homeowners actually start with green-roofing a smaller structure like an outbuilding, shed, or even doghouse) and whether the gardening and maintenance portions or handled through professionals or DIY. Experienced green roof professionals are always recommended!

5. How much maintenance is required for a Green Roof?

 
Maintenance is generally low, but also depends on whether you’ve invested in an extensive or intensive garden. Plant types also determine how much is required in the way of watering and weeding.

Green roofs can be an incredibly beautiful, earth- and pocketbook-friendly way to bring nature closer to your home. Contact Bayscape if you don’t want to do it alone, we are happy to help and guide your process?

Bayscape Landscape Management